I love buying things I need

buying things i need

This evening I opened a small package that came to me from Australia. It’s from a small business called Spiralocks, and it contained a hair tie made especially for people with dreadlocks. I purchased it on Etsy.

I removed my stretched-out hair elastic from my dreads and put in the Spiralock. It held my hair incredibly well and I was so glad I made the purchase!

Beyond the fact that it works, I love that my purchase supported a small business. I love that I am wearing something handmade with love. I love that it is different, unique. I have only one, so it is special to me. And it will 100% last longer than those cheap hair elastics!

It feels wonderful to make a successful purchase. To buy something you need, something that works, and something that you like. (tweet that)

I’ll admit, however, that in the past I would buy things I didn’t need, that didn’t work that great, and that I wasn’t even all that crazy about.

Why on earth did I spend my money then?!

Because I was looking for fulfillment through material things. It’s the same reason I will go buy ice cream when I’m still stuffed from dinner. It’s not healthy and it wont make me happy in the long run, but I’m remembering a time when I bought ice cream and it did make me happy, and I’m searching for that feeling again.

It’s the same with clothes or electronics (the two areas I see this happen most often.) We remember that time we bought something we needed and loved, and we chase after that feeling again.

Remember how wonderful it felt when you got your first smart phone and could finally text photos to your family? Well that was a completely different experience than five upgrades later, when there really isn’t that much new benefit you’re getting.

Sometimes we associate positive feelings with buying something, when the positive feelings really came from the benefit of the thing. But a marginal benefit hardly justifies a purchase, and can often just perpetuate our need to buy more and more, ever searching for fulfillment. (tweet that)

This is a really difficult thing to overcome. And it’s something that many (dare I say most) people struggle with. To stop buying things for fulfillment means to find actual fulfillment, which requires taking a good, hard look at oneself and one’s values. I’m not trying to give anyone a mid-life crisis, so I’ll just let you know that this is something that I am still working on, and that I support you in working on it, too.

It’s okay if it’s a life-long project. Our culture has raised us to be massive consumers, so it’s no fault of our own that this is how we are. But the future is in your hands, as are your decisions. You can chose to take back control of your priorities and your values. You can choose to end a pattern of debt and guilt. You can bring joy into your life through select, meaningful purchases. And you can open yourself up to finding fulfillment from so many other areas. I’m excited to see what we all discover!

 

Decluttering my life has brought me peace of mind and relief from the world around me. There’s nothing like walking into the space you created and knowing you have nothing more than what you need. I write articles to help others create that same feeling for themselves.

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