What I’m packing for 2.5 months in South America

Awhile back I wrote a post on how to pack like a minimalist. This time, I’m sharing with you the specific things I’m bringing on an extended trip to South America.

My boyfriend and I are heading out from the USA to Chile, Argentina, and Uruguay, for a 10 week adventure. We’re staying in Air Bnbs and hostels, mostly in large coastal towns, with one inland city thrown in half way through.

I plan on spending the majority of my time on the beach, but anticipate lots and lots of walking around the city and some hiking outside the city. We are going in summer so the temperatures will be in the 70s-90s during our stay. We will have access to laundry at some of our apartments. We are each checking one large hiking pack on the flights, and each bringing a daypack as our carry-ons.

Here’s what I’m bringing for 70 days:

Clothes

  • dresses x4
  • short-sleeve tops x6 + long-sleeve top
  • sweatshirt
  • shorts
  • workout shorts + yoga leggings + workout top + sports bra
  • lightweight nightgown + bra + pasties
  • underwear x 20
  • socks x9
  • sunhat + swimsuits x3 + beach towel
  • scarf (functions as headwrap for dreads + beach sarong)
  • baseball cap
  • sneakers + sandals

Toiletries
  • Dailies contact lenses (30 pairs… monthlies would be better if I had any!)
  • sunscreen (spf 50 sport + oil-free x2 for my face — and I’m sure we’ll buy more there)

 

  • makeup bag (2 shades lipstain, under-eye concealer, eyelash curler, mascara, mineral foundation ( + small one in darker shade to mix in as I get more tan), mineral blush, foundation brush, blush brush, tweezers, nail file)

 

 

  • shampoo
  • face wash x2
  • St. Ives exfoliating scrub
  • razor
  • natural deodorant + himalayan salt deodorant bar (both being natural, neither is perfect so I often wear both at the same time)
  • toothbrush + toothpaste + floss
  • bar of soap
  • mineral bath (bit unnecessary but we might want to indulge after the long flights 😉 )
  • bandaids (waterproof and regular)
Gadgets
  • cell phone + charger
  • laptop + charger + case
  • headphones + headphone splitter
  • Spotify playlists + podcasts/audio books downloaded
  • outlet adapters
Documents
  • passport + driver’s license (and photocopies)
  • saved pdfs of hotel/flight confirmations (accessible without wifi)
  • saved Google maps (accessible without wifi)
  • credit card + debit card + cash
Odds and Ends

  • herbal tea (Air Bnb’s often only have caffeinated teas stocked)
  • cbd oil
  • melatonin
  • Dramamine
  • toilet paper
  • handkerchiefs x2
  • sunglasses + case ( + Rx sunglasses + case)
  • crossbody handbag + daypack

And that’s it!

Update: If anyone’s curious, when I checked the hiking bag at the airport check-in, it weighed 17-20 lbs (differed a bit from airport to airport). Not bad! That was with everything listed above inside, minus the daypack which I had taken out to be my carry on, and inside the daypack I had my electronics, crossbody handbag, handkerchiefs, and some snacks we bought for the flight. The daypack weighed 6.5lbs.

Did I forget anything? Let me know if I missed one of your must-haves in the comments!

Decluttering my life has brought me peace of mind and relief from the world around me. There’s nothing like walking into the space you created and knowing you have nothing more than what you need. I write articles to help others create that same feeling for themselves.

You only have one neck — How to declutter your scarf collection

How many scarves do you own? Go ahead, count them. Wait, can you find them all first? I know some are in this closet, some in that closet… some in that storage bin…

I grew up in California. I maybe owned one scarf. Then we moved to Iowa, and I suddenly needed new apparel for 6 months out of the year.

I bought a couple scarves, and few mittens, a few hats, and a warm winter coat.

I also learned how to knit. So I knitted myself another scarf, a pair of hand warmers, and a hat. My mother also took up crocheting, and made me a hat and a scarf. The friend who got me into knitting gave me a scarf that year for Christmas.

Within my first few months as a Midwesterner, my scarf collection sextupled.

Some of them were itchy. Some weren’t my color. Some unraveled a bit. But I was 16 and you better believe I kept them all anyway!

As the years went by, more scarves were given. As my knitting improved, more scarves were knitted. And the closet shrank and shrank.

Now allow me to really blow your mind: I only have one neck.

How did I ever manage to wear all those scarves? Well, some only got a couple wears before the season was over. Which is the very definition of excess. Especially considering I would typically just throw on the same one I wore the day before.

When you pair having too many choices with also being lazy, you usually end up with the same choice, over and over again. (tweet that)

I’m glad to say that since then I have narrowed my scarf collection down considerably. I have two uber-warm winter scarves, one light-weight trendy scarf, and one mid-weight scarf.

Here’s how I narrowed it down:

1. Divide your collection into cold-weather scarves and mid-temp scarves

There’s no use decluttering your scarves only to discover that you’re left with all spring/autumn scarves and have nothing left for really cold weather. So make sure you divide them into these two categories before narrowing the, down so you’re sure to have at least one left for each temperature range. Note, I also had a few scarves that I would consider “summer-weight”, but as I currently live in a place that’s super hot and humid during the summers, that just seemed impractical for me, so I didn’t keep any from that category. Depending on where you live, that third category might be appropriate.

2. Pair them with the outfits you wear during those seasons

If your thickest scarf only matches your favorite spring outfit, get rid of it. When the weather is appropriate to finally wear it but it doesn’t match with any of your winter items, then it will sit in your closet unworn all season. Items have to coordinate (to your personal standards) or you wont feel right wearing it. Of course if matching doesn’t matter to you or you have a mostly capsule wardrobe already, then you can skip this one.

3. Try it on

Is it itchy? Does it stay in place or slip around and get in your way? Is it too bulky under your current coat? Does it actually keep you warm? Does it make you too warm?

4. Rank them by favorite

If at this point you still have too many perfect scarves that haven’t fallen short in any area mentioned above, lay them out in order from your absolute favorite to your least favorite. Tell yourself you have to get rid of one more. You’ll probably know right away which one you just can’t part with. Any others can probably go.

5. Make sure they’re in your color season

Remember that since scarves are worn right up by your face, they are a key item to make sure is within your color season. A scarf outside your color season can make you look washed out — which is especially unflattering since we lose our summer glow during the cold months as it is. A beautiful scarf that brings out your features and makes your skin look radiant can effortlessly brighten your whole appearance.

With these checkpoints, you can narrow down your scarves to only those which are comfortable, practical, and look great on you. You deserve to be warm while looking your best!

As a final tip, here’s some ideas of what to do with the scarves you don’t keep.

1. Donate them to your local women’s shelter. Women’s shelters take all sorts of items from clothes, to hygiene items (shampoo, etc), to clothes and toys for the children who often accompany the women in need. Check with your local shelter to see what they take. That scarf that was perfect but just not your favorite could be someone else’s new favorite!

2. And for the knitters who keep a constant supply of scarves coming in, create your new pieces with those women in mind. Or, knit them for hospital residents. They will take blankets, too, if you’re looking to go beyond scarves. Keep in mind that some hospitals only take new items, so donating your used pieces is best for shelters.

Good luck, stay warm, and happy knitting!

Decluttering my life has brought me peace of mind and relief from the world around me. There’s nothing like walking into the space you created and knowing you have nothing more than what you need. I write articles to help others create that same feeling for themselves.

It’s perfectly fine to break up with friends you’re just not that into

“Breaking up is hard to do”. But so is hanging out with someone who makes you feel awkward af. (tweet that)

Let me rephrase that. It’s not that they make you feel awkward; it’s that you feel awkward around them. They aren’t doing anything wrong, it’s just… them. Or you. Or you with them. But somehow the conversation always dies down, it gets awkward, and you dread it.

On the flip side, you have that other friend, with whom there are never ever awkward silences — but that’s because she never stops talking about herself and her problems. Not only is it an unbalanced relationship you two have, but it’s a depressing one. You walk away feeling drained, feeling like you would have rather not gone out at all.

I’ve had interactions with both of these people. And I’ve separated myself from both of them. The first one was a very kind friend, but something about our vibe together just felt awkward, so when we naturally drifted, I let it happen and made absolutely no effort to maintain the friendship.

The other, I never got that close with in the first place (you can only get so close when a relationship is one-sided.) And so I just stopped attending events where this person would be there.

Instead, I have chosen to nurture friendships with people I actually like. (tweet that)

Imagine that! Positive interactions where I come away from it feeling great, and feeling like there’s never enough time to talk about all the great things we want to share with each other. Comparing the social circle I have now to the one I had a few years ago is like night and day. Back then I felt like an outsider; I felt depressed and like I had no really fulfilling interactions in my life. Now I have an abundance of them.

“If you keep what you don’t want, you’ll never have enough room for what you do want.” (tweet that)

Feeling too guilty to end things with somebody?

Trust me, they’ll get over it. Chances are, it hasn’t been that fulfilling for them either. I doubt they’ll be completely blindsided. Plus, just don’t be a jerk about it and you can walk away guilt-free. It’s really okay. And if you still feel guilty, remember that you are not responsible for anyone else’s happiness but your own.

What decisions can you make about who you spend your time with, that will bring you happiness today?

Decluttering my life has brought me peace of mind and relief from the world around me. There’s nothing like walking into the space you created and knowing you have nothing more than what you need. I write articles to help others create that same feeling for themselves.